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Homes

Valeriya Moskaleva curates an artistic haven with minimum partitions and maximum light

APR 24, 2021 | By Urvika Barua
The home boasts a material palette that includes concrete, glass and untreated brass for a vibrant and majestic look; Photographs by Mikhail Loskutov
The focal point of the living room is this grand piano, which is played by the homeowner; Photographs by Mikhail Loskutov
The bespoke, four-poster bed uses silk organza for the canopy and cushions trimmed with ostrich feathers; Photographs by Mikhail Loskutov

Valeriya Moskaleva transforms this 1,227 sq ft abode in Moscow into an arena with the most open space with “minimum partitions, maximum light”. The resulting design that combines two, one-room apartments is super bold and incredibly creative (using doll furniture and decor!).

The interiors focus on a contrasting play of hues and materials. Rough, concrete ceilings and walls with exposed wires are offset by velvet curtains, crystal chandeliers, baroque armchairs, pink fur pillows as well as ornate consoles and mirrors.

This is evident right from the entrance, where we find a standard corridor divided by a metal rack, custom-designed by Moskaleva. It holds the homeowner’s collection of porcelain, including the 1950s Little Red Riding Hood and the Gray Wolf from WKC.  

The living room is decked with furniture by Jimmie Martin, vintage framed portraits and a custom made crystal chandelier; Photographs by Mikhail Loskutov

Instead of a doormat, a cast-iron plate weighing more than 30kg sits on the floor. A console from Reputation Factory is seen here, over which is a copy of English painter Thomas Gainsborough’s Lady in Blue and nearby is a decoration panel from DoorsBrothers. 

Above the console from Reputation Factory is a copy of Thomas Gainsborough’s Lady in Blue painting; Photographs by Mikhail Loskutov

The focal point of the main living area is the grand piano, which is often played by the homeowner. Opposite it, a kitchen and dining section is carved out. 

Seen here are the onyx dining table, Scavolini Diesel kitchen and custom fireplace; Photographs by Mikhail Loskutov

Furniture by British designer duo Jimmie Martin is placed against the grey concrete walls in the living room. The crystal chandelier seen in this space is custom-made by Masiero. The bespoke lighting adapts the renowned “Maria Theresia” shape with coloured crystal inserts.

The grand piano and bedroom are divided by a wall of framed photographs; Photographs by Mikhail Loskutov

We love that Moskaleva has position a fireplace on the column nearest to the dining ensemble! On long, winter evenings, this will be one of the cosiest spots in the open-plan home.

View of the dining room, its adjoining fireplace and the Scavolini Diesel kitchen; Photographs by Mikhail Loskutov

“The client wished for an antique kitchen, comparable to her grandmother’s,” says Moskaleva, who found a close match at Scavolini Diesel. She adds, “The brand had one with glass fronts and steel worktops. This simple design was the ideal choice.” 

The homeowner’s desire for an antique kitchen similar to her grandmother’s was fulfilled with this Scavolini Diesel set; Photographs by Mikhail Loskutov

The luxe bedroom features a bespoke bed with apple-coloured Sahco fabric for the upholstery and silk organza for the canopy. Ostrich feathers are used to trim cushions, while custom velvet curtains are sourced from Maison Henry Bertrand. 

A nook with stunning views is turned into a home office; Photographs by Mikhail Loskutov

A mobile, mirrored mosaic panel divides the bedroom from the bathroom, whose window looks out to the secluded forest. The concrete palette continues in the dressing area and is offset by pops of pink and purple.

Pops of pink and purple offset grey tones in this dressing area; Photographs by Mikhail Loskutov

Since the homeowner favoured metal to wood, most of the decor is made using concrete, glass and untreated brass for a vibrant, majestic look. The Ebony & Co wooden flooring is aged in place, while the brick walls are coated in different hues.

This bespoke four-poster bed uses silk organza for the canopy and cushions with ostrich feathers; Photographs by Mikhail Loskutov

Moskaleva practically freed up the space on functional terms, eliminating any partitions or even constructing a bathroom that looks out to the forest. The only other independent space is a walk-in dressing room that’s accessible from the corridor and proceeds to the bedroom.

Inbuilt, concrete counters serve as storage space; Photographs by Mikhail Loskutov

“It is difficult for me to pinpoint the style the interior relates to. We simply decided not to follow any rules; we just designed and decorated the home to suit the homeowner with no regard for popular trends. This is why it is an intimate and exclusive space,” states Moskaleva. 

Scroll below to see more images from this artistic, open-plan home in Moscow by Valeriya Moskaleva…

A mobile, mirrored mosaic panel segregates the bedroom from the bathroom; Photographs by Mikhail Loskutov

 

A traditional tub with gold legs is seen in the bathroom; Photographs by Mikhail Loskutov

 

A peek into the edgy powder bath; Photographs by Mikhail Loskutov