; The Wall of Being by Evolving Radical Aesthetics acts as a canvas

Homes

The Wall of Being by Evolving Radical Aesthetics embeds nostalgia

NOV 16, 2021 | By Kashish Kaushal
The minimal fluid design of the bare concrete seating in the sunset terrace plays as a canvas to experiment with the potted plants; Photographs by Justin Sebastian
The sunset garden between the courtyard and koi pond, on the first floor, beside a large opening to the west side, performs as an elevated portico at the centre of the house to enjoy the afternoon sun; Photographs by Justin Sebastian
Tropical themed artworks from Guernica Art Gallery induce contemplation and calmness in one’s mind; Photographs by Justin Sebastian
Antique accessories from Pythrik Antique Gallery enrich the formal living area with solid wood and plush fabric sofa from Magari; Photographs by Justin Sebastian
Floral carpet from Cinnamon, up-cycled thatched cane furniture with accent cushions from Decor World stand out from the toned down background in the upper living area; Photographs by Justin Sebastian
The residence stands at a y-junction in a dense residential neighbourhood of Kozhikode, a coastal city in the south Indian state of Kerala, on a linear plot deprived of views to the outside; Photographs by Justin Sebastian
Metal planter basket from The Purple Turtles, Bengaluru coupled with carpets from Fabindia and Decor World impart a bohemian vibe to the sunset terrace; Photographs by Justin Sebastian
The wooden ceiling, concrete column and steel railing initiate the dialogue with the wall; Photographs by Justin Sebastian
An open kitchen area is connected to the living area where the rustic touch in overall design is continued; Photographs by Syam Sreesylam
The corten steel staircase compliments the white walls, with wooden tread emphasizes on the verticality of the space and defines the separation with bold steel box sections; Photographs by Syam Sreesylam
Furniture pieces from Magari and artworks by Guernica Art Gallery stand in contrast with the wall of being; Photographs by Justin Sebastian

Evoking the homeowners collective memory of their ancestral home, this 4,500 sq ft home situated in Kozhikode, Kerala revolves around the idea of creating contemporary, abstract spaces that are relatable and make one feel at ease. Crafted by Muhammed Ashiqe and Rumna K. P., lead architects of Evolving Radical Aesthetics, the home christened ‘The Wall of Being’ is built on a linear plot in a dense residential neighbourhood.

In order to ensure privacy, an inward-looking plan has been adopted from which the idea of an abutting wall was conceived. The wall acts as a canvas depicting one’s roots and cultural background from which the three-dimensional volume of the house emerges.

A central axis is maintained in parallel to the ‘wall of being’ at both the ground floor and the first floor enabling a seamless dialogue with all spaces at the same time establishing optimum segregation and privacy.

The tropical weather of a state like Kerala is kept in mind while designing this space; Photographs by Justin Sebastian

 

The varied semi open spaces bring in cool air and offer much needed relief from the heat and humidity experienced in Kerala; Photographs by Syam Sreesylam

“The design process culminated in the idea of making spaces that trigger nostalgia of the region, at the same time relying on modern architectural characteristics. Further briefed to a concept of creating a modern, abstract, but relatable aesthetic,” divulges Ashiqe.

The central open space becomes the soul of the house from which all other spaces draws light and ventilation.; Photographs by Syam Sreesylam

Paving the way inside, a cantilevered three-dimensional volume serves as a car porch and shades a small verandah. The verandah further opens to a blank wall ornamented by a large wall art that terminates into a long corridor.

Hanging lights from The Purple Turtles, Bengaluru adorn the dining area; Photographs by Justin Sebastian

On the left side, the wall stays subtle as a backdrop to the formal living area adorned with retro furniture and floral rugs. From here on the wall guides us throughout the house. 

The living area is sandwiched between two courtyards and as a consequence, receives ample natural sunlight. Towards the right, a bedroom is kept segregated from the common areas. Moving along the corridor the dining room greets the eyes on the left side, islanded by the courtyard on the left side and Koi pond to the right.

Floating treads of the stairs add to the lighting and ventilation of the space beneath where the common wash and bathrooms are zoned away from the living area. 

A central axis is maintained in parallel to the wall of being at both the ground floor and the first floor, enabling a seamless dialogue with all spaces and at the same time establishing optimum segregation and privacy; Photographs by Justin Sebastian

As one heads to the upper level, they are greeted by the sunset garden on one side with cut-outs that look into the courtyard and the water body. A bedroom is tucked into the left side abutting the wall with a serene view to the Koi pond and its entry is hidden from the major axis. The major axis parallel to the ‘Wall of Being’ terminates at a blank wall with a large artwork where the entrance to the bedroom is hidden from plain view. 

The minimal fluid design of the bare concrete seating in the sunset terrace plays as a canvas to experiment with the potted plants. A bohemian approach was taken in the composed placements of potted plants and bright coloured rugs and accent cushions are used to accentuate the garden space.

Upcycled retro cane chairs from Pythrik Antique Gallery, Vadakara imparts a regal character to the upper living area; Photographs by Justin Sebastian

Further walking along the passage to the left, one reaches the upper living near the balcony, where the placement of the traditional wooden coffered ceiling is seen. This complex design stands in stark contrast with the simple wall. 

Table lamp by Fabindia, cushions from Decor World atop retro cane chairs from Pythrik Antique Gallery grace the bedroom; Photographs by Justin Sebastian

The use of natural stones lined with pearl grass enhances the front yard experience. From the traditional ornament box repurposed as a side table to the wooden swing with a patterned rug laid over, the character of furniture in the ‘swing garden’ pays homage to the client’s rich Malabar past. The wooden ceiling, concrete column and steel railing initiate a compelling dialogue with the wall. 

The minimal fluid design of the bare concrete seating in the sunset terrace plays as a canvas to experiment with the potted plants; Photographs by Justin Sebastian

“The overall character of the house lies in the contrast which was experimented in the design in terms of textures, colours and concepts. The client’s background in jewellery design catalysed the application of intricacy in the details as seen in the interiors. We wanted a canvas not just for the visual treat that nature offers but for the multi-sensory galore that is offered by the flora and fauna present in the space,” concludes Rumna.

Scroll down to see more glimpses of the space…

The swing garden on the first floor overlooking the road is the place where one engages with the neighbourhood at the south end; Photographs by Justin Sebastian

 

A sense of belonging is created for the user as they experience the comfort of the evolved adaptation of vernacular architecture layered with an indegenious material palette; Photographs by Justin Sebastian

 

The introduction of open to sky courtyard and koi pond evoke one’s collective memory of traditional houses of Malabar; Photographs by Justin Sebastian

 

This bedroom is tucked in to the left side abutting the wall with a serene view to the Koi pond and its entry is hidden from the major axis; Photographs by Justin Sebastian

If this home brought back memories of your home town, make sure you checkout this Kolkata apartment by Essajees Atelier!