; Studio Slip crafts a traditional Kashmiri home in Bengaluru

Homes

Studio Slip imagines a traditional Kashmiri home in Bengaluru exuding modern comfort

AUG 16, 2022 | By Maheshwari Vickyraj
Wall art of Kashmiri Crewel embroidery sourced from The Hundred Hands NGO; Photographs by Parth Swaminathan,2022 Photographix India
The dining area houses the Home Centre's 8-seat dining table combined with Fabindia's wicker-detail chairs against a wall with fluted panelling; Photographs by Parth Swaminathan,2022 Photographix India
The Kashmiri-style family room features floor seating with a silk carpet from Kashmiri Emporium; Photographs by Parth Swaminathan,2022 Photographix India
The master bedroom features an Amberville bed flanked by Lakkadhara with bedside tables on either end. The wall above has a delicate gold leaf miniature art by Hemant Kumawat; Photographs by Parth Swaminathan,2022 Photographix India
A pink armchair from Gulmohar Lane adds a pop of colour to Bulbul’s room; Photographs by Parth Swaminathan,2022 Photographix India
Bulbul’s room features a customised hand-carved bed; Photographs by Parth Swaminathan,2022 Photographix India
The Balcony features a coffee table from Bohemiana and a dhurrie from Fabindia; Photographs by Parth Swaminathan,2022 Photographix India
The house has studio-made handles with cushions from Good Earth, Fabindia, and The Purple Turtles; Photographs by Parth Swaminathan,2022 Photographix India

A  glance at this Kashmir-inspired house of 1,900 sqft juxtaposed in the modern dwellings of Sarjapur, Bengaluru, crafted by Kamini Rao, Founder of Studio Slip and Sharon John, Project Design Lead narrates the process of how functionality met culture. 

Infused with Kashmiri motifs and captivating a thirst for nostalgia, this abode is designed to pay an ode to the culture of “Jannat-e-Kashmir” with a contemporary twist. 

Wall art of Kashmiri Crewel embroidery sourced from A Hundred Hands NGO; Photographs by Parth Swaminathan,2022 Photographix India

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The curious brief 

Panun Gar, which means “Our Home” in Kashmiri, is a balance of colour, tradition and modern functionality. Understanding the family’s need to feel connected to their roots and connoting to create a smart contemporary home with traditional elements that are woven into their space, which celebrates not only their culture but also community.

The foyer is decorated with Warli art pieces on the wall and candle stands along with a Hosley mirror; Photographs by Parth Swaminathan,2022 Photographix India

Tour every turn of the home…

Stepping foot through the foyer immediately sets the tone for the rest of the home with its blue-grey walls decorated in Warli art pieces, an open plan with living and dining space with a stunning double-height ceiling that overlooks a large balcony, making the space bright and airy. Oorjaa paper lights and tall embroidered namda tapestries were sourced to accentuate the height that connects the two levels of the home.

The double-height ceiling is highlighted with hanging Oorjaa paper lights and embroidered Namda tapestries; Photographs by Parth Swaminathan,2022 Photographix India

To add more storage, the stairwell is used as a bookshelf, featuring floral wallpaper. Next to the stairwell is the narrow kitchen, which has the Chhabria tiles, reminiscent of Kashmiri carpet patterns.

The far end houses the master bedroom, which has pops of vibrant traditional accents. This bedroom features an Amberville bed flanked with delicate old-leaf miniature art by Hemant Kumawat hung above it. 

Amberville bed flanked by Lakkadhara bedside tables on either end with the wall decorated with delicate gold leaf miniature art by Hemant Kumawat in the master bedroom; Photographs by Parth Swaminathan,2022 Photographix India

Navigating upstairs through the corridor, the son’s room on the left is minimal and is bathed in muted monochromatic colour scheme with a sombre study corner. To the right is the traditional Kashmiri-styled living room, which features floor seating with a silk carpet from the Kashmiri Emporium. The hallmark of the room is the louvred accordion shutter, which allows you to peek into the living room below, connecting the two living rooms of the house.

While the daughter, Bulbul Khoda’s bedroom is doused in a muted palette of blues and pink with a customised hand-carved bed and a pink armchair from Gulmohar Lane adding a pop to the room. 

The study has a Lakkadhara desk with a ukulele dotting the table with a chair paired from Fabindia; Photographs by Parth Swaminathan,2022 Photographix India

Ideas to bookmark – colours and materials

Sticking to the theme of a contemporary Kashmiri house, Kamini says, “We decided to set the tone of the house in blues, pinks and beige.” For the material, she further adds, ” we wanted to use richer materials such as hardwood, marble, brass accents and juxtapose them with rustic hand-made crafts like the paper lamps, cane and embroidery.”

The dining area houses the Home Centre’s 8-seat dining table combined with FabIndia’s wicker-detail chairs against fluted panelled wall; Photographs by Parth Swaminathan,2022 Photographix India

 

Chhabria tiles are used in the kitchen to reminisce the patterns of a Kashmiri carpet; Photographs by Parth Swaminathan,2022 Photographix India

What Kamini fell in love with… 

Showcasing the client’s Kashmiri culture in new ways through the NGO The Hundred Hands, Kamini sourced art from different craft and art communities in India such as Worli art, Kashmiri hand-knotted silk carpets, modern formed furniture with customised hand-embroidered tapestries, which stood as a testament to their philosophy. 

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