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Sahil Bagga and Sarthak Sengupta: Name to know

DEC 17, 2015 | By Aditi Sharma Maheshwari
The metal chair is built on the concept of a meandering river. The form is fluid and the cushions fixed on to the frame look like pebbles which are lying on the banks of the river

New Delhi-based designers and Godrej Design Lab 2015 winners (a contest in collaboration with ELLE DECOR India for designers of all ages), Sahil and Sarthak are no strangers to global fame. Their light installation for Christmas is currently being showcased at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. Adding to their gamut of innovative products, their Pebble chair is the perfect example of form and function, with sustainability at its core.  “We wanted to create a product that was nature-inspired.

“The metal chair is built on the concept of a meandering river. The form is fluid and the cushions fixed on to the frame look like pebbles which are lying on the banks of the river,” share the duo. Representative of water, sand and pebbles, the hues chosen were along the shades of grey and charcoal. Although the product may seem lacking symmetry, the duo claim that the ergonomics of it is well thought out – it is extremely comfortable to sit on.

The first sample was exhibited for the contest. Local artisans and skilled labour gave form to the product and completed it in about two weeks. Every component of the product was made keeping in mind its ease of replication at Godrej. “We work with a lot of artisans and skilled people; we wanted to create something that complements the capabilities of the in-house production team of Godrej,” aver the pair.

The structure was created with a sheet of metal, which is laser cut. The upholstery too can be easily fabricated and emulated by skilled artisans. The placement of the pebbles was done in an organic manner, keeping in mind however, that it doesn’t look too random either. The play of light and shadow in all their products is an important element. When the chair is placed in sunlight or artificial light, it casts an interesting shadow on the floor.

Sahil and Sarthak are currently working on a furniture project for Jindal Steel, where they are mixing the dynamic craft of Gujarat with steel; a design that helps propagate the notion that this metal too can be graceful and artistic. Another recently completed project, Kerala Sutra for Somany Ceramics was a product that showcased the mixing of vitrified tiles with the art of Kerala; it was the marriage of industry and craft.

After their much talked about the installation at the London’s V&A museum, “our next dream destination for displaying our art forms would be at the Guggenheim Museum and the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York,” conclude the two.