; 725 Design uses contemporary functionality for Project Mosca

Homes

Katerina Kovalenko of 725 Design captures the essence of contemporary functionality with Project Mosca

APR 6, 2021 | By Urvika Barua
The artsy living room features a custom-made couch, tables from Miniforms, Moroso armchair and Flos floor lamps; Photographs by Katerina Kovalenko
Another view of the living room and its expansive windows; Photographs by Katerina Kovalenko
The headboard cocoons Minotti side tables and brings in a pop of colour into the bedroom; Photographs by Katerina Kovalenko

Curated by architect Ilya Klimenko and designed by Katerina Kovalenko of 725 Design, Project Mosca is a 800 sq ft apartment for a young couple in Moscow

The home is contemporary and bold, owing to the breccia flooring, neutral white walls and vibrant corduroy tones that establish a lavish and cosy ambience.

Calling her style ‘stringing beads on a thread’, the founder of 725 Design shares, “We take a bright space and fill it with memories, reflecting upon the homeowners’ souvenirs or decor that illustrate each family member’s persona.”

The living room features cushy furniture, a freestanding Flos floor lamp and mosaic-inspired flooring; Photographs by Katerina Kovalenko

Just inside the main door, a metal arched shelf divides the foyer from the rest of the home. Nearby, a sole storage structure and a personal organiser for the client’s wine collection links the kitchen and living room.

The foyer is separated from other spaces by a metal arched shelf; Photographs by Katerina Kovalenko

The kitchen boasts a quintessential charm with burgundy chairs and a vintage chandelier. The mosaic-inspired flooring continues on and the material is also used as backsplash wall tiles here.

Burgundy chairs and a vintage chandelier add an old-world charm to the kitchen; Photographs by Katerina Kovalenko

A hammock is placed between the living room window openings along with a brush-sculptured claw sharpener, for the family pet—a sphinx cat.

A customised couch is placed in the home office; Photographs by Katerina Kovalenko

A home office is crafted and finished in a separate shade from the rest of the home. This is done keeping in mind that the space may need to be transformed into a nursery in the future.

On the window side of the home office is an IKEA table; Photographs by Katerina Kovalenko

The home office is also equipped with a wide storage capacity to switch the current items (books and records) with children’s literature, toys and clothing in the future. 

A Minotti side table and a fabric bed offsets the fluted headboard; Photographs by Katerina Kovalenko

The homeowner’s bedroom is fitted with a walk-in wardrobe and a hostess dressing table. The latter is conceptualised to fulfil the couple’s dream for a dressing room. It is fitted with lights, compact folding mirrors and dark green walls. The hue continues into the bathroom, where terrazzo tiles also feature.

The dressing area is fitted with folding mirrors, luxe lights and a walk-in closet; Photographs by Katerina Kovalenko

“The main bathroom is a complex space, which came with its own set of intriguing challenges,” shares Kovalenko. 

Terrazzo tiles and green glass in the bathroom is accented with grey stone design; Photographs by Katerina Kovalenko

The result of her clever plans is a relaxing and restful environment with large-sized terrazzo flooring and walls that transport users to a land of hot stones and spas, encouraging them to explore nature’s therapeutic hues. 

A bold, charcoal-hued bathroom features captivating art; Photographs by Katerina Kovalenko

“The storylines alter in the interior, varying between offbeat, interactive and multipurpose. Being a huge fan of personalised furniture, I believe that furniture, along with architecture, can be labelled as a complementary aspect in the interiors of a home,” concludes Kovalenko.