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Design

This rejuvenating workplace in Mumbai by reD Architects blends technology and tradition in equal measure

MAR 8, 2021 | By Saloni Rege
A variety of casual seating configurations are planned in the breakout zone. Cement floor steps by Beco lead to an artwork by Sunil Padwal and a Defurn chair; Styling by Samir Wadekar; Photographs by Fabien Charuau
A reception area is carved into a niche and highlighted by Bert Frank’s Lizak pendant light; Styling by Samir Wadekar; Photographs by Fabien Charuau
The FCML wooden floor is an ideal backdrop for the Panzeri VIISI light, Sunil Padwal artwork, Defurn vase, ColoreD_100 table and Herman Miller Setu chairs; Styling by Samir Wadekar; Photographs by Fabien Charuau
This open-plan workplace uses Flos lights, art by Sunil Padwal and Apoorva Shroff, Herman Miller Aeron chairs and standing desks, and a Defurn vase; Styling by Samir Wadekar; Photographs by Fabien Charuau

An open plan concept paves the way for this experimental and youthful workplace in Mumbai. Designed by reD Architects, the 6,500 sq ft office is planned for a Japanese investment firm, so it was only natural for the creative practice to plan Oriental-inspired interiors with minimalist yet detailed decor.

The first glimpse of this influence can be seen past the reception, where a voluminous, double-heighted atrium is simply decked to draw attention to the sweeping vistas of the city.

Apoorva Shroff and Rajiv Parekh, partners at reD Architects along with Ekta Parekh and Maithili Raut, led the plans for this project.

The central atrium is encased in cross-stacked bricks from Décor. It uses Bomma Phenomena pendant lamps, a ColoreD_100 round table, Cocoon Fine Rugs piece, FCML wooden floor and Black Slate bar counter with cardboard texture by Bandana Jain; Styling by Samir Wadekar; Photographs by Fabien Charuau

They turned to traditional courtyards to create the atrium that serves as a breakout zone. The duo says, “At first sight, we knew that the treatment of this volume would be our biggest challenge but also our most exciting opportunity. And it turned out better than we ever imagined.”

View of a conference room, which houses a Sunil Padwal piece and suspended light from Artys; Styling by Samir Wadekar; Photographs by Fabien Charuau

The atrium houses a variety of seating configurations near an island counter. Here, a tall brassia tree leads to a terrace that overlooks the gardens around Nehru Planetarium. This tranquil centre also acts as a pivot around which multiple meeting rooms are placed.

The other end of the voluminous atrium houses indoor plants from Retiwala and a Sampei lamp by Davide Groppi by the window, under the coffered ceiling; Styling by Samir Wadekar; Photographs by Fabien Charuau

Taking advantage of the voluminous space, Shroff and Parekh planned a mezzanine floor accessed via a folded plate metal staircase, resonating as a multilevel interactive zone for employees.

Replacing rigid cabins are free-flowing meeting pods that are segregated by transparent glass partitions, which frost up for privacy when required. It’s no wonder that after this intentionally casual workspace, the architects have been roped in to design the firm’s Shanghai outpost too!