; Art of Minimalism, by Vivek Kadecha Interiors invites us to a divine abode

Homes

Art of Minimalism, an intimate and minimalist abode by Vivek Kadecha, invites us to a divine realm

FEB 10, 2021 | By Saloni Rege
Eschewing the need for art is a turquoise patch on the IPS oxide walls in the living room. Also seen are a faux leather sofa and cushions from Gulmohar Lane and IKEA and Jayesh Shukla's sculpture on the centre table; Styling by Chintan Dhaduk; Photographs by Dhrupad Shukla
The kitchen features Ambaji marble countertop, teak cabinetry and copper-finished teardrop planters from Studio Palasa; Styling by Chintan Dhaduk; Photographs by Dhrupad Shukla
View of the open-plan dining and culinary spaces; Styling by Chintan Dhaduk; Photographs by Dhrupad Shukla
Detail of the Indian white Ambaji marble countertop in the kitchen; Styling by Chintan Dhaduk; Photographs by Dhrupad Shukla
The living room is done up using fabric and tapestry from Drape Shoppe, an IKEA table lamp and a sculpture by artist Jayesh Shukla; Styling by Chintan Dhaduk; Photographs by Dhrupad Shukla

We’d love to live in a house that ages gracefully over time! That’s why we’re in awe of this simplistic abode christened ‘Art of Minimalism’ by Vivek Kadecha, founder and principal designer of Vivek Kadecha Interiors, Lifestyle & Design.

This 700 sq ft home in Ahmedabad is a canvas of integrated spaces and textures with a vernacular essence. The entire two-bedroom apartment is conceived as minimal and hassle-free, making it perfect for the enthusiastic couple who owns it.

“I’ve always believed that spaces are akin to living beings. When you unfurl the fabric of ornamentation and imitation, what remains is the beauty of scars and tragic imperfections. And that was my approach with this project too,” shares Kadecha.

The simplistic living room features IPS walls with a turquoise patch as well as faux leather sofa and cushions from IKEA and Gulmohar Lane; Styling by Chintan Dhaduk; Photographs by Dhrupad Shukla

Therefore, the abode weaves in the homeowners’ frequencies and their simple, working lifestyle. On entering, a clutter-free foyer with wall-infused storage spaces opens out to a warm and inviting living room. A sense of intimacy prevails owing to the use of traditional artisan techniques for embellishments.

Pictured here are the centre table with Ambaji marble top, a karma sculpture by artist Jayesh Shukla and table lamp from IKEA; Styling by Chintan Dhaduk; Photographs by Dhrupad Shukla

Dotting the minimal living room is a faux leather sofa, dark olive accent chair, a sleek centre table with an Indian marble top and customised solid wood furniture—all of which are placed on kadappa stone flooring and lend a soothing vibe.

View of the kadappa floor in heritage finish and IPS oxide walls; Styling by Chintan Dhaduk; Photographs by Dhrupad Shukla

The highlight of the abode are its grey IPS oxide walls by Vernacular Building Techniques. The texture has a unique attribute of reflecting soft light and creating a subtle ambience. This low saturated colour palette is punctuated by a turquoise patch in the same material, which adapts as an artwork.

Partial views of the dining area and inbuilt storage; Styling by Chintan Dhaduk; Photographs by Dhrupad Shukla

The dining and open kitchen are interspersed for easy circulation. The furniture is made using reclaimed teak and veneer, adding to the earthy theme of the house. Like the centre table, the dining table and kitchen counter are finished in Indian white Ambaji marble.

Teak-finished cabinetry and the Ambaji marble countertop define the kitchen. Also seen is a copper-finished teardrop planter from Studio Palasa; Styling by Chintan Dhaduk; Photographs by Dhrupad Shukla

The vernacular alignment is obvious in both the master and guest bedrooms. Indeed, the former is dressed in metal furniture in matte black and bed linens from Saphed Home’s Gulaabjal and Haldar series, adding to the divinity of the room.

Seen here is the master bedroom with IPS finished walls, customised metal bed by the team, linen bedding from Saphed Home, IKEA table lamp, teak wood wardrobe polished with tel paani finish; Styling by Chintan Dhaduk; Photographs by Dhrupad Shukla

All in all, the entire apartment focuses more on the intangible and so the walls are free of embellishments. Instead, they are simply treated in local, age-old techniques and polished in wax and coconut oil. Kadecha puts it perfectly when he says, “My creations echo my influences, the client and the project typologies. I believe that if design ignores people, people ignore that design.”