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Homes

Designer Tejal Mathur creates a cosy and elegant home with modern touches for two brothers in Kolkata

SEP 25, 2020 | By Simone Morarka
The entertainment pad is appointed with sofas by Zolijns and the Terra Bass Bianco coffee table by Scarlet Splendour. Corrugated sheets coated a charcoal hue complement the sundown- perfect ambience; Photographs by Neville Sukhia
The spacious living room features a cosy couch and wooden influences; Photographs by Neville Sukhia
Bespoke, inbuilt wardrobes with micro-concrete surfaces bring to focus the Heirloom bed set by Restoration Hardware. Also seen are an Origami-patterned carpet by The Busride Studio, a classical armchair by Red Blue Yellow and a rug by Ironworks; Photographs by Neville Sukhia

Brothers Saket and Pranay Agrawal visited Tejal Mathur in her studio to talk about what they wanted for their apartment in Kolkata and suggested that she give the house an upscale voice instead of going for a traditional look.

“Having widely travelled and lived in different international cities, Pranay insisted on a relaxed luxurious space, throwing at me several clippings of wildlife reserves, London lofts and Kerala walls. A quiet personality has been incorporated in the house through Saket’s collection of handpicked art from over the years,” said Tejal.

This led her on the inspiring journey of designing their Kolkatta apartment. There are three floors, one each for the two brothers and one for social engagements.

The silent IPS walls feature with ‘Entitled’ by D Jayaprakash and a Saraswati on Shellac subdues the aggression; Photographs by Neville Sukhia

The identical floor plans indicated minimalism and gave two different viewpoints in planning. Hence, one was given a vast island breakfast bar and the other, an extensive master bedroom. Several permutations later, a strong dialogue between two simple finishes emerged—the cavernous solitude of micro concrete and the varied grain of Indian teak. 

The outdoor bar houses a majestic ceiling carving brought in from an antique store in Jodhpur. Distressed pottery by Ironworks adds to the laid-back look with abundant greens and bespoke hardwood barstools; Photographs by Neville Sukhia

The idea was to have a relaxed space where you could walk barefoot, interjected with the sharp lines of white marble tops, bookshelves, and sumptuous wooden window screens to lend a sophisticated look. Edgy accents like Flos lamps, Italian silk couches, and quirky hues help provide a consistent architectural narrative. A10ft-high ceiling clad in plywood warmed it all up.

Bespoke lightweight concrete panels act as a backdrop to a hardwood bed. Tobacco leather trunks by Ironworks act as nightstands. A less formal study sits against the window with the Eames classic chair; Photographs by Neville Sukhia

Tejal matched the unique personalities, of each brother by designing an open tub squat in the centre of the walk-in wardrobe for one, while the other preferred a private bathroom suite. Two separate conversations, not without endless deliberations, with distinctive personalities, led to a cohesive bungalow-like feel, anchored with memories of skilled carpenters at work, and a nostalgic view of La Martiniere from the west window.

Lightweight concrete panels with crafted wine glass racks form the backdrop for the bar section. The space also features an antique carved wall panel from Rajasthan, the Bilbo stool by Alessandra Percalo for Riva from Zolijns, and a custom-cut 3D floor by Vives; Photographs by Neville Sukhia

It is a space exuding modernity, which allows you to enjoy the verdant view whilst enjoying a rare bottle of red. “It was an experience that has left a deep mark on my own creative process,” concludes Tejal. 

Scroll to see more images from this gorgeous Kolkata home…

This intriguing flooring is illuminated by Flos’ Match lamp by Vibia; Photographs by Neville Sukhia

 

An almirah by Ironworks with a steel accent stylishly stands with the plywood ceiling and walls. Distressed pottery breaks the sombre look; Photographs by Neville Sukhia