; Studio Nishita Kamdar crafts a minimalistic bachelor pad

Homes

This 980 sq ft by Studio Nishita Kamdar is a minimalistic bachelor pad exuding a bare, raw magnetism

JUL 22, 2019 | By Nitija Shastri
CLOCKWISE, FROM LEFT Photographs by Talib Chitalwala. The greyish green couch sits in the living room backed by a wooden door with fluted glass paneling, making the space appear sharp yet cosy; Photography by Talib Chitalwala. When you tread a few steps in, you will transition from the media room to the master bedroom. Enter the rugged room with deep hues to explore how Kamdar works with beige and grey tones to suit the owner’s vibe. Also seen is a wooden cupboard which adds a rustic appeal to the decor; Photography by Talib Chitalwala. A Peek a Boo Window within the door adds an element of quirk. The Door Slides into an inconspicuous pocket behind the bar unit to completely expose the kitchen to the living room; Photography by Talib Chitalwala. A Peek a Boo Window within the door adds an element of quirk. The Door Slides into an inconspicuous pocket behind the bar unit to completely expose the kitchen to the living room.
FROM LEFT Photography by Talib Chitalwala. The Kitchen unit Is designed in an egg shell tiled countertop with pinstriped teak wood battened shutters, making the kitchen look more connected with the rest of the spaces. The services are tucked into pockets to make the space look clean and easy to maintain; Photography by Talib Chitalwala. The dining table, A stunning cantilevered Black Terrazzo table with a Brass edging stands like a monolith island in the space , also modestly flows into the adjoining room to become a shelf , exaggerating the connectivity of the space; Photography by Talib Chitalwala. The Master bathroom too is designed in a monochromatic , Raw concrete looking vitrified tile which envelopes all the sides of the bathroom , thus making it look like an almost under construction plastered wall; Photography by Talib Chitalwala. The Kitchen unit Is designed in an egg shell tiled countertop with pinstriped teak wood battened shutters, making the kitchen look more connected with the rest of the spaces. The services are tucked into pockets to make the space look clean and easy to maintain.

A man cave, nestled right in the heart of Mumbai provides plenty of eye candy and food for thought. Besides being practical and functional, this 980 sq ft, this (smaller) slice of h(e)aven is surrounded by—the towering residential buildings on one side and a solemn training headquarters on the other. Crafted in raw and natural materials, the design of the home, helmed by Nishita Kamdar is all about clean lines, natural materials and subdued tones.

The design brief was simple, “The client wanted a space which felt like a large bachelor pad, enough to give him his own privacy but as well as flexible enough to entertain his large group of friends,” she says. So then how does the material palette realise the brief? “In minimalism, the design elements convey the message of simplicity,” explains Nishita. “Architectural space is about layering for all of the senses—which like a musical composition, spatial features come together into a symphony for occupants to experience. Bringing a space to life means that architectural function and form is not just primarily for the visual sense,” she says.As you enter the living room, you will notice a restraint palette of colours and materials and by simple forms and overlapping materials that add character to the entire area. Colours like beiges and greys with natural materials colours are retained to create a soothing space.

The star of the house—A striking cantilevered black terrazzo table with a metallic brass edging stands like a monolith island in the space. The piece that rests in the dining room, also functions as a modest shelf to the adjoining room, “Exaggerating the connectivity of the space,” says Nishita. “The marble-clad wall, balancing the dining table with the teak wood glass door forms an interesting composition of joineries,” she adds. The kitchen unit is designed in a raw plaster finish looking tiled countertop with pinstriped teak wood battened shutters, maintaining the seamlessness within the space.

Finally, tread a few steps in and you will transition from the media room to the master bedroom through a wooden and fluted glass partition. Enter a very bare rugged and deep-hued room, “Much like the owner himself, a deep thinker but absolutely simple.” The bathroom is completely enveloped with a monochromatic, raw concrete looking vitrified tile, making it look like an almost under-construction plastered wall. Drawing attention to shape, colour and texture of the space inhabited, the apartment proves that a good minimalist house can be achieved through simplicity in forms, materials and details.

Head here to learn more about Nishita Kamdar’s work, ideas and more…