The living room showcases a grey ceiling with a plastered roof slab. The grooves on the ceiling were made by placing wooden frames above concreting plates and then pouring the concrete above it. The dining table was developed in house by our team, while the sofa was sourced from a local shop

The modular kitchen has clear and green powder stained wooden shutters and natural stone counter top, while its north side wall is polished cement with vertical grooves

Upper bedroom on the east side has a room wide narrow window above the bed to let in sunshine. It also has a floor to ceiling bay windows made in powder stained wooden frames. The ceiling is weathered concrete sheet ceiling with clear polish

Foyer ceiling is polished cement with horizontal grooves, while staircase handrail is made in brick wall paint finished with polished wooden top rail

The inner partitions of the bathroom are finished in black oxide with the WC area tuck to the corner. The teakwood wash counter was an old study table and Buddha statue is a flea market find from Goa. The teak wood old study table is the owner's own. The wall tiles are from Kajaria collection

This villa in Kerala is a slice of paradise

by Nupur Ashok Sarvaiya Oct 12, 2016
Kerala is a feast for the senses, from the bright colours of the emerald backwaters to the aroma of exotic cuisine to the cacophony of festivals – all of which are thrilling but perhaps a bit overwhelming at times. That’s why a little relaxation is always a bonus.

So it comes as no surprise that the state is also home to some incredible houses that offer zen-like comfort to its residents. And justifying this flair is a gorgeous villa perched in Kochi, imagined by Avinash Joshy and Steffy Thomas of Nirvana Design. “The house was designed in a style which I like to call as contemporary tropical. We wanted to have natural textures and hues to play around and also providing ample space in a moderate spaced home,” avers Avinash.

The brief shared with the creatives was simple: To realise a family home filled with energy and open spaces. In keeping with similar external elevations that would be in tandem with the other villas, the home was intentionally inward looking to bring in privacy for the residents and have views into the courtyard. “We were involved from the start of the project and developed the floor layout with the help of structural designers,” he adds.

On entering, you’re greeted with paintings by local artists that adorn the foyer on the west side. The entrance hall then opens up to double height living and dining area, where the ceiling is polished in cement with horizontal grooves. The living, dining and the kitchen are aligned in a single line to offer open spaces for free movement. The living and dining area opens seamlessly to the courtyard and the courtyard also connects the kitchen to the kitchen garden on the north side.

“My favourite space would be the upper bedroom” that interacts with the double volume living area because “it reflects a different character each day, every time and it is something that needs to be experienced,” reveals Avinash. Unlike conventional boudoirs, there isn’t a traditional bed frame where the mattress is propped. The bedroom also has an open bathroom planned as part of it, while the wardrobe acts as a partition between the areas.

The inner partitions of the bathroom are finished in black oxide with the WC area tuck to the corner. The teakwood wash counter was an old study table and Buddha statue is a flea market find from Goa. The teak wood old study table is the owner's own. The wall tiles are from Kajaria collection