Most of the furniture was customised. The feature wall has limited edition prints from Artist Sameer Kulavoor and Sarita Handa
Photographs courtesy Sebastian Zachariah

Left: Flame of the Forest lights above the dining table is from Viya Home.
Right: The unit next to the sofa opens up to become a bar. The shutter was an old door, picked up from Viya Home, modified to fit as the bar shutter

Left: A teal colour backsplash has been incorporated on one of the kitchen walls.
Right: The powder room is laced with a customised sandstone basin and the tiles are from Bisazza

The headboard in the master bedroom is tailor made and fitted with a designer guild fabric and the wallpaper is from Carl Robinson

The artwork in the second bedroom is an untitled series from artist Datta Bansode

The unit behind the study was designed in such a way that it could have sufficient storage for files and crockery and yet be a part of living room decor

This Neoclassical style apartment will inspire your next home makeover

by Nupur Ashok Sarvaiya Dec 06, 2016
Harking back to the harmonious structures from 18th century Rome and Greece, neoclassical architecture marked minimalism, symmetry, and magnificence, while contrasting the larger than life opulence of the 17th century Rococo era. Taking this monumental style indoors is Mumbai based firm PS Design that imagined an evocative colour and curios filled hermitage for actor Monica Bedi.

“We have combined modern pieces with vintage and antique ones – the idea was to combine the old world charm into modern pieces so the design is timeless,” avers Priyanka Pradeep, principal architect, PS Design. The brief shared was clear cut: The apartment needed to have European aesthetic. “While Monica has fond memories of her childhood in Europe, I felt since the space eventually was in India, it needed to match our sensibility. This is why we used a lot of fabrics especially from Sarita Handa, which were realised in India but spoke an international language.”

The apartment, originally 2.5 BHK, was transformed in to a two bedroom, where one room was combined as a part of the living room. The living room was designed in a way that one corner could be used as a study and the other as a dining. Thanks to abundance of natural light from the floor to ceiling windows, the area exudes openness. A subdued colour palette with white and beige shades dominates the home, while colour accents in terms of accessories, wallpapers and fabrics have been added in all the rooms.

“All the four walls in the living room are treated differently, yet the underlying theme is same to bind the whole space together. The feature wall is the most visually arresting aspect of the home – it is adorned with pieces sourced from across the globe. On the other hand, building the television wall was challenging as the idea was to create a backdrop which would hold the set, look unique in terms of texture and yet not clash with the feature wall next to it. We took wood printing blocks of various shapes and sizes, made a collage out of those to form a backdrop and then painted them white,” she adds.

The boudoirs followed a similar path as the living room, where the essence of the rooms are kept simple and white, while the pop of pink is incorporated in the master bedroom and pale yellows in the other one.


The unit behind the study was designed in such a way that it could have sufficient storage for files and crockery and yet be a part of living room decor